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​Subordinate legislation

Subordinate legislation can only be made if primary legislation confers a power to do so. The primary legislation is known as the enabling act, because it enables the subordinate legislation to be made. In Wales, the Welsh Ministers make subordinate legislation using powers given to them in enabling acts such as Senedd Acts, Assembly Measures and Acts of the UK Parliament. Subordinate legislation is also often referred to as delegated legislation, because the power to make subordinate legislation is delegated by the enabling act. Subordinate legislation is also referred to as secondary legislation. 

For example, under section 33(3) of the Regulation and Inspection of Social Care (Wales) Act 2016, "The Welsh Ministers may by regulations make provision about the qualifications and other conditions to be met by an individual who may be an inspector".

In this example, the enabling act is the Regulation and Inspection of Social Care (Wales) Act 2016, and section 33(3) of that Act enables the Welsh Ministers to make subordinate legislation (in the form of regulations) about the qualifications of social care inspectors. Without that enabling power, the Welsh Ministers could not make subordinate legislation about the qualifications of social care inspectors.

In Wales, Welsh statutory instruments are the most common form of subordinate legislation and usually take the form of regulations or orders. Other forms of subordinate legislation can include codes of practice, rules, schemes or guidance.

Statutory Instruments

Subordinate legislation is usually made as a statutory instrument. This means that the rules set out in the Statutory Instruments Act 1946 will apply to the subordinate legislation.

In relation to statutory instruments, the role of the Legislation, Justice and Constitution Committee* is to consider and report to the Senedd against criteria set out in the following Standing Orders:

  • Standing Order 21.2 – for example, matters that might call into question the legality of a statutory instrument or whether a statutory instrument is in both English and Welsh. The Committee must consider and report on these matters. Matters reported under Standing Order 21.2 are known as technical reporting points.
  • Standing Order 21.3 – for example, matters that are likely to be of interest to the Senedd, such as a statutory instrument that does not implement policy in the way claimed or that is considered to be politically contentious or significant. The Committee may consider and report on these matters. Matters reported under Standing Order 21.3 are known as merits reporting points.

If the Committee is content with a statutory instrument, it is referred to as having a clear report. If the Committee is not content with a statutory instrument, it will issue a report in accordance with Standing Order 21.2 and/or Standing Order 21.3. Such reports inform the Senedd of any issues that arise in relation to statutory instruments; the Committee's reports do not constitute any form of veto as regards statutory instruments. Under Standing Order 21.4 the Committee must report within 20 days of a statutory instrument being laid before the Senedd.

Handling of statutory instruments under Standing Order 21.2 and Standing Order 21.3 – 25 March 2020 to 17 April 2020

Under section 11A(4) of the Statutory Instruments Act 1946, if a negative procedure statutory instrument made by the Welsh Ministers is not laid before the Senedd at least 21 days before the statutory instrument comes into force (i.e. has effect), the Welsh Government must notify the Presiding Officer and explain why there has been a breach of the "21 day rule".

The procedures relevant to the consideration of statutory instruments by the Senedd are set out in Standing Order 27 (but note Standing Order 27.14 which applies Standing Order 27 to subordinate legislation that is not in the form of a statutory instrument).

Other correspondence relating to Bills, Subordinate Legislation; Statutory Instruments requiring Consent; Written Statements made under Standing Order 30C; and Legislative Consent Memorandums can be found at the relevant page relating to the specific item of legislation.

Procedures

Regulations made under EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 subject to sifting

The European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 provides UK Ministers and the Welsh Ministers with regulation-making powers to amend existing primary and secondary legislation.

Paragraph 4 of Schedule 7 to the 2018 Act provides for a committee in the Senedd to sift certain regulations that the Welsh Ministers propose to make under the negative procedure known as ‘proposed negative regulations”. The sift Committee will then consider the appropriate procedure to be followed, either negative or affirmative.

Subordinate legislation subject to the negative procedure

The negative procedure provides that, after the Welsh Ministers have exercised their power to make subordinate legislation, they must lay the subordinate legislation before the Senedd. The Senedd then has a period of 40 days to object to the subordinate legislation. If the Senedd does not object, then the subordinate legislation continues to have effect (it 'continues' to have effect because the subordinate legislation will have automatically taken effect as soon as it was made available to the public). If the Senedd does object, then the subordinate legislation is annulled and nothing further can be done under the subordinate legislation. Most subordinate legislation made by the Welsh Ministers follow this procedure.

Subordinate legislation made by the Welsh Ministers and UK Ministers acting together

Sometimes, the enabling act will say that subordinate legislation must be made jointly by both the Welsh Ministers and UK Ministers acting together. This kind of subordinate legislation must be laid before both the Senedd and the UK Parliament. The enabling act will specify what procedure applies.

Breach of the 21 day rule letters

Subordinate legislation must be laid before the Senedd at least 21 days before it comes into effect. If this rule is breached, the Welsh Government has to notify the Presiding Officer of the reasons.

Subordinate legislation subject to the affirmative procedure

The affirmative procedure provides that the Welsh Ministers cannot exercise their power to make subordinate legislation unless the Senedd has passed a resolution approving a draft of the subordinate legislation. The subordinate legislation is therefore laid before the Senedd in draft form, and cannot have effect unless the draft is approved by the Senedd. This procedure is often reserved for more significant subordinate legislation.

Subordinate legislation subject to other procedures

A very small proportion of subordinate legislation is subject to specific procedures set out in the enabling act. These procedures include: (i) enhanced affirmative procedures (sometimes known as super-affirmative procedures), see for example the procedure set out in section 19 of the Public Bodies Act 2011; (ii) the provisional affirmative procedure, see for example the procedure set out in sections 25(2) and (3) of the Land Transaction Tax and Anti-avoidance of Devolved Taxes (Wales) Act 2017; and (iii) the draft negative procedure, see for example the procedure set out in sections 144ZF(5) to (7) of the Water Industry Act 1991.

Subordinate legislation which follows special Senedd procedures

Some subordinate legislation follows a special Senedd procedure, meaning it cannot be made or confirmed by the Welsh Ministers until the procedures laid down by Standing Order 28 have been complied with.

Subordinate legislation subject to no procedure

Some subordinate legislation is not subject to any formal procedure other than it must be laid before the Senedd. Some subordinate legislation does not even have to be laid before the Senedd. For example, commencement orders (i.e. subordinate legislation that specifies a date when primary legislation comes into force) usually are not subject to any formal procedure and do not have to be laid before the Senedd. The Welsh Ministers notify the Committee of commencement orders, but they are not usually scrutinised by the Committee.

Subordinate legislation relating to the UK’s exit from the EU highlighting changes that need to be made

These instruments relate in some way to EU law. As a result, the Legislation, Justice and Constitution Committee* is reporting to the Senedd separately on these instruments, highlighting issues that may have implications arising from the UK exiting the EU for information only and to help with understanding of how such law may need to change in the future.

Subordinate legislation - Commencement Orders

Some subordinate legislation does not have to be laid before the Senedd. Commencement orders (i.e. subordinate legislation that specifies a date when primary legislation comes into force) usually are not subject to any formal procedure and do not have to be laid before the Senedd. The Welsh Ministers notify the Committee of commencement orders, but they are not usually scrutinised by the Committee.

Subordinate legislation that amends the Government of Wales Act 2006

Section 109 of the Government of Wales Act 2006 allows Her Majesty, by Order in Council, to amend Schedule 7 to the 2006 Act, provided that a draft of the Order has first been approved by the Senedd and both Houses of Parliament.

Standing Order 25 provides for the procedure to be followed in respect of the consideration of Orders in Council that are to be made under section 109 of the Government of Wales Act 2006.

Subordinate legislation laid too late in the Fourth Assembly for Committee scrutiny

The following subordinate legislation was laid before the Fourth Assembly at a point that did not allow time for consideration by the Fourth Assembly's Constitutional and Legislative Affairs Committee.

​* Following a resolution in Plenary on 29 January 2020, the Constitutional and Legislative Affairs Committee became the Legislation, Justice and Constitution Committee.

Previous Senedd Business

 

 
 

Progress of current Legislation

Guidance on Legislation

Read the current guidance on submission and scrutiny of Legislation.

Progress of Senedd Bills

​View the progress of Senedd Bills currently under scrutiny at the Senedd

Text of Acts as passed

The text of Senedd Acts and the UK Bills they amend ​are available on the Legislation.gov.uk website

Visit Legislation.gov.uk

 
 

Previous Senedd Business​​

Acts in the Fourth Assembly (2011-2016)

​Since May 2011, the Assembly's primary legislation has taken the form of Acts. The Assembly's legislative competence was also significantly expanded.

Measures in the Third ​​​​Assembly (2007-2011)

New legislative powers were conferred on the Assembly at the start of the Third Assembly in May 2007. The Assembly could pass "Measures" in areas where it had legislative competence.

Statutory Instruments in the First and Second ​Assembly

When the Assembly was first formed its only powers to legislate were through the passing of Statutory Instruments.

 
 

 

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